You're thinking, "come on...this is headline bait. How can these two topics be even remotely connected?" This Venn diagram depicting Internet privacy (created by Dave Hoffman) is our answer.
No, you and your fellow employees are not celebrities. Celebrities are subjected to an unfortunate level of attention. And in this case, a hacker pulled the celebrity photos from password-protected iCloud accounts and not social media. But there are some relevant takeaways from this unfortunate scandal you can apply to you and your company's social media policy.

1) Simplest Approach: If you don't want someone knowing about it...don't put it online. Snapchat is rendered useless via a screen grab. The Secret app isn't really secret. Yet I always get "what if" questions from folks running through a Byzantine list of privacy settings that they think will keep them safe from prying eyes. Well, if it's online, it's just not 100 percent safe.

2) Short & Simple Policy: If you can say it to your Mom and your competitor, it's probably safe to say online. 

3) Go With Your Gut: If you're asking, "should I post this?" Your gut instinct may be a red flag. So check first.

Training Must Follow Policy
And one more reason the nude celebrity photo scandal is related to your social media policy is training. A social media policy spells out everything you can't do, but you better be showing employees what they can do. Many employees will not understand the subtleties of certain platforms. If you don't walk them through the platforms you want them to use, and how you want them to use it, the odds are they'll be used incorrectly, if at all.

:: Kevin Dugan, @prblog

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